Тренировочный вариант ЕГЭ по английскому языку №4

Тренировочный вариант состоит из 31 задания (№10-40). Ответом может быть цифра, несколько цифр, слово или несколько слов. Обратите внимание: ответ всегда записывается без пробелов, например 97531 или яблокорябина. На выполнение тренировочного теста у вас есть 180 минут. Закончив работу, нажмите «Завершить тест». Яндекс.Репетитор подсчитает ваш результат и покажет верные ответы.
#263

10. Задание#T5505

Установите соответствие между текстами A–G и заголовками 181–8.
  1. A lasting relationship
  2. An inspirational city
  3. An unexpected discovery
  4. A brilliant celebration
  5. A random birthday
  6. Undestroyed beauty
  7. The future of the city
  8. Not intellectual enough
A. Nobody knows when Moscow first appeared on the face of the earth. It is true that the first mention of Moscow dates back to 1147, but by that time it had probably been around for a while and was big enough to be mentioned in the Russian chronicles. Still, it is convenient to use that date to celebrate Moscow’s anniversaries which we are doing this year – Moscow has turned 870, a respectable age for one of the biggest capitals in the world!

B. Throughout its history, Moscow has been visited by many English speakers. The first British people arrived in Moscow in 1553 by accident. In the age of great geographical discoveries, when Spanish and Portuguese navigators were sailing the world in search of the shortest way to Asia, British merchants tried to find their own way – through the Arctic. When they were stopped by ice, they turned their ships south and ended up in Russia.

C. Ivan the Terrible was happy to meet the first English merchants and granted them privileges to make trade between Russia and Britain easy. This was how The Muscovy Company appeared in Britain. The Czar even granted them a house near the Kremlin. This solid brick building has survived all the fires of Moscow and can be visited today. In 1994, during Queen Elizabeth’s visit to Moscow, it was turned into a museum – The Old English Court.

D. Mr Francis Pargiter was one of the merchants of The Muscovy Company and visited Moscow in the 1660s. He did not leave a written account of his trip, but his impressions of Moscow were recorded by his friend – Samuel Pepys, a Member of Parliament who kept a diary. Mr Pargiter described Moscow as ‘a very great city’ but mostly with wooden houses and with very few people playing chess and ‘not a man that speaks Latin’!

E. In 1867, Moscow’s 720th anniversary, a trip to Moscow was undertaken by the author of “Alice in Wonderland”, Lewis Carrol. He described Moscow as a ‘wonderful city, a city of white houses and green roofs, of conical towers that rise one out of another like a telescope; of bulging glided domes, in which you can see as in looking glass, distorted pictures of the city.’ It is believed that the idea of “Through the Looking Glass” came to the writer during his trip to Russia.

F. In 1917, during the restless days of the Revolution, when not many people even remembered Moscow’s 770th anniversary, Moscow was visited by the American journalist John Reed. Among the fires and destroyed buildings, he was happy to see St. Basil’s Cathedral untouched: ‘Late at night we went through the empty streets to the great Red Square. The church of Vasili Blazheiny loomed fantastic, its bright-coloured cupolas vague in darkness’.

G. In 1947, the American writer John Steinbeck witnessed Moscow’s 800th anniversary celebration. ‘The walls of the Kremlin and its towers were outlined in electric lights. Every public building was floodlighted. In every public square dance stands had been put up, and in some of the squares little booths, made to look like Russian fairy-tale houses, had been erected for sale of sweets, and ice-cream, and souvenirs’, he wrote in his Russian Journal.
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Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании один заголовок лишний.
Запишите в поле для ответа последовательность цифр, соответствующих текстам ABCDEFG.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

11. Задание#T5514

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 171–7. Одна из частей в списке 171–7 лишняя.

Whales in a Noisy Ocean

Whales use sound in very different ways. Some whales produce songs that travel over vast distances. They also use echolocation, like bats, (A)________. But other noise in the ocean creates a problem for the whales.

Since 1987, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) has sent their research vessel Song of the Whale around the world (B)________. During the travels, the Song of the Whale scientists have developed expertise (C)________ to listen to and record the sounds that the animals make. This helps them to track, identify, and survey different species.

One of the threats facing whales and other marine animals is noise pollution in the seas, such as noise from drilling, military activities, oil exploration, and coastal construction. This noise can cause great distress to whales and dolphins and can (D)________.

It is feared this noise pollution may cause mass strandings, (E)________. If the Song of the Whale team can (F)________, then hopefully the nature and location of disturbing noise can be changed.
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  1. in using underwater microphones
  2. to locate food and find their way
  3. result in injury and even death
  4. track and identify their habitats
  5. to filter out food from the water
  6. to provide a platform for marine research
  7. when large numbers come ashore
Запишите в поле для ответа последовательность цифр, соответствующих частям ABCDEF.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

12. Задание#T5515

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
Показать полностью
Drivers of Hackney carriages insulted people who were using umbrellas because
  1. they wanted to sell umbrellas themselves.
  2. they were trying to save their business.
  3. the owners of umbrellas were French.
  4. they didn't like what umbrellas looked like.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

13. Задание#T5516

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
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The funny and clever features of the first umbrellas did NOT include the following:
  1. making special noises
  2. having transparent parts
  3. being totally waterproof
  4. having a container for a drink
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

14. Задание#T5517

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
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Before 18001800 the word ‘umbrella’ meant
  1. the same as the word ‘parasol’.
  2. nothing: it simply did not exist.
  3. ‘a device protecting you from the rain’.
  4. any kind of shade of any shape.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

15. Задание#T5518

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
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What did Samuel Fox do?
  1. He replaced heavy whalebone with light metal.
  2. He became rich having discovered light metals.
  3. He wrote specifications for a quality umbrella.
  4. He participated in the revolutionary movement.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

16. Задание#T5519

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
Показать полностью
The French were laughing at the British during the Battle of Waterloo because
  1. the French were winning.
  2. the British looked funny.
  3. the British copied the French.
  4. it was General Lejeune’s tactics.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

17. Задание#T5520

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
Показать полностью
Which statement is NOT true about Major Digby Tatham-Warter?
  1. He had a British sense of humour.
  2. He was a typical British eccentric.
  3. He used an umbrella as a weapon.
  4. He didn’t find war serious or scary.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

18. Задание#T5521

Прочитайте текст и выполните задание.

Umbrellas

Ha, ha, ha! How they laughed that day in the 1790s when a man first walked the streets of London holding an umbrella.

Some people got angry and began shouting that to carry such a contraption was ungodly because it ‘defied the heavenly purpose of rain’ (which is to get us wet).

Drivers of Hackney carriages soon realised umbrellas posed a threat to their trade, and insulted chaps who carried them by yelling: ‘What’s wrong – are you a Frenchman?’ It was a grievous insult (and still is today), but the umbrella was not to be denied.

Eton schoolboys took to carrying them, much to the annoyance of their headmaster, John Keats. “An effeminate innovation,” he thundered. “We are degenerating into a girl’s school.”

Early umbrellas were not impenetrable to rain. Their coverings of cotton, or even silk, were coated with oil, varnish or melted wax, which soon cracked.

They featured all kinds of gimmicks. Some had windows, or whistled when open. There was an umbrella with a gutter, which drained rain down a tube. A variation on this caught rain in a flask for use as drinking water.

It was not until about 1800 that umbrellas and parasols achieved separate identities in Britain. Since ancient times there have been umbrellas to keep off the sun, but the word umbrella had nothing to do with rain. It is derived from Latin ‘umbra’, meaning shade.

Until the early 1850s umbrellas had heavy whalebone frames which tended to crack. But then Samuel Fox came on the scene, and from his factory in Stockbridge, Sheffield, he revolutionised the umbrella world. In 1852, he patented a lightweight metal frame which was to make him a fortune and set the standard for umbrellas we know today.

The first umbrellas came to Britain from France but by the time of the battle of Waterloo in 1815 it was the French who were laughing at the British for using them. Napoleon’s General Lejeune was highly amused that English officers rode across the field of battle holding aloft umbrellas and parasols. It might have looked ridiculous, but the British won!

That was not the only instance of umbrellas being used by the British army. The British Major Digby Tatham-Warter, veteran of WWI, and a commander of a parachute brigade during WWII, always carried an umbrella into battle. This not only provided some British humour in otherwise very serious and frightening circumstances, but was even used by the brave major to fight the Germans. Once he disabled a German tank by pushing the umbrella through the observation slit and wounding the driver in the eye.

Some collectors believe that now is a perfect time to start collecting antique umbrellas and parasols, as they are reckoned to be underpriced, a situation which could easily change if more people got the idea of collecting them. Parasol styles seemed to change every few months in the 19th century, so there are plenty to choose from. Beautiful parasols made in Victorian times can be bought for as little as 30 to 100 pounds, but even a rare Georgian umbrella with carved ivory grip might be unlikely to exceed 500 pounds at an auction.
Показать полностью
According to the author of the article, Victorian parasols are
  1. now cheap to buy.
  2. collectors' favourites.
  3. not reliable enough.
  4. not sold at auctions.
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

19. Задание#T5522

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Mount Everest

(1) Mount Everest is 8,863 meters above sea level. (2) It is part of the Himalayan range in South Asia.

(3) Despite its awesome height, the mountain (CLIMB) ________ many times.

(4) Sir Edmund Hillary and his guide, Tenzing Norgay, were the (ONE) ________ to climb the mountain, reaching the summit on May 29, 1953.

(5) Mount Everest attracts well-experienced mountaineers as well as novice climbers, quite a few (WOMAN) ________ among them.
Преобразуйте слово (CLIMB) в предложении (33) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

20. Задание#T5523

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Mount Everest

(1) Mount Everest is 8,863 meters above sea level. (2) It is part of the Himalayan range in South Asia.

(3) Despite its awesome height, the mountain (CLIMB) ________ many times.

(4) Sir Edmund Hillary and his guide, Tenzing Norgay, were the (ONE) ________ to climb the mountain, reaching the summit on May 29, 1953.

(5) Mount Everest attracts well-experienced mountaineers as well as novice climbers, quite a few (WOMAN) ________ among them.
Преобразуйте слово (ONE) в предложении (44) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

21. Задание#T5524

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Mount Everest

(1) Mount Everest is 8,863 meters above sea level. (2) It is part of the Himalayan range in South Asia.

(3) Despite its awesome height, the mountain (CLIMB) ________ many times.

(4) Sir Edmund Hillary and his guide, Tenzing Norgay, were the (ONE) ________ to climb the mountain, reaching the summit on May 29, 1953.

(5) Mount Everest attracts well-experienced mountaineers as well as novice climbers, quite a few (WOMAN) ________ among them.
Преобразуйте слово (WOMAN) в предложении (55) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

22. Задание#T5525

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

The Office

(1) Martha works in an office. (2) Her job is to hire new people. (3) The more work the new members of staff carry out, the higher their pay.

(4) Martha wishes her job (BE) ________ as highly paid as some of the other employees’.

(5) She (NOT MIND) ________ having an assistant, either.

(6) An assistant (CAN) ________ share some of her responsibilities.

(7) But she knows that the load of work is (SHE) ________ and nobody is going to help her.
Преобразуйте слово (BE) в предложении (44) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

23. Задание#T5526

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

The Office

(1) Martha works in an office. (2) Her job is to hire new people. (3) The more work the new members of staff carry out, the higher their pay.

(4) Martha wishes her job (BE) ________ as highly paid as some of the other employees’.

(5) She (NOT MIND) ________ having an assistant, either.

(6) An assistant (CAN) ________ share some of her responsibilities.

(7) But she knows that the load of work is (SHE) ________ and nobody is going to help her.
Преобразуйте слова (NOT MIND) в предложении (55) так, чтобы они грамматически соответствовали содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

24. Задание#T5527

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

The Office

(1) Martha works in an office. (2) Her job is to hire new people. (3) The more work the new members of staff carry out, the higher their pay.

(4) Martha wishes her job (BE) ________ as highly paid as some of the other employees’.

(5) She (NOT MIND) ________ having an assistant, either.

(6) An assistant (CAN) ________ share some of her responsibilities.

(7) But she knows that the load of work is (SHE) ________ and nobody is going to help her.
Преобразуйте слово (CAN) в предложении (66) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

25. Задание#T5528

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

The Office

(1) Martha works in an office. (2) Her job is to hire new people. (3) The more work the new members of staff carry out, the higher their pay.

(4) Martha wishes her job (BE) ________ as highly paid as some of the other employees’.

(5) She (NOT MIND) ________ having an assistant, either.

(6) An assistant (CAN) ________ share some of her responsibilities.

(7) But she knows that the load of work is (SHE) ________ and nobody is going to help her.
Преобразуйте слово (SHE) в предложении (77) так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово или словосочетание введите в поле ответа без пробелов.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

26. Задание#T5529

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (DIGIT) в предложении (22) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово введите в поле ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

27. Задание#T5561

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (VARY) в предложении (33) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово введите в поле ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

28. Задание#T5562

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (RELATED) в предложении (33) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово введите в поле ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

29. Задание#T5563

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (FAVOUR) в предложении (44) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученное слово введите в поле ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

30. Задание#T5564

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (USE) в предложении (66) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученные слова введите в поле ответа без пробелов и запятых в порядке их появления в тексте.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

31. Задание#T5565

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст.

Treasure Not Trash

(1) Collage is a well-practiced and popular form of art.

(2) It appears in all kinds of media that artists may work in today, including the (DIGIT) ________ formats.

(3) Collage combines colour and texture of (VARY) ________ items that are often (RELATED) ________ to each other.

(4) You can make a self-portrait, a picture of a (FAVOUR) ________ pet, or a scene using collage as the format.

(5) It is good to be kind to the environment, too, and to use things that are recyclable. (6) Things that are deemed (USE) ________ trash and scrap make great art for those with a (CREATE) ________ goal in mind!
Показать полностью
Образуйте от слова (CREATE) в предложении (66) однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически соответствовало содержанию текста.
Полученные слова введите в поле ответа без пробелов и запятых в порядке их появления в тексте.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

32. Задание#T5566

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой A.
  1. to
  2. over
  3. from
  4. for
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

33. Задание#T5567

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой B.
  1. although
  2. therefore
  3. however
  4. thus
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

34. Задание#T5568

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов словосочетание, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой C.
  1. in turn
  2. in appearance
  3. in general
  4. in conclusion
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

35. Задание#T5569

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово или словосочетание, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой D.
  1. despite
  2. although
  3. in spite of
  4. even if
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

36. Задание#T5570

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой E.
  1. discouraged
  2. courageous
  3. encouraged
  4. incorrigible
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

37. Задание#T5571

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово или словосочетание, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой F.
  1. similar
  2. alike
  3. same as
  4. such as
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

38. Задание#T5572

Прочитайте приведенный ниже текст.

The Lake District

The Lake District is a popular National Park. More and more people enjoy its fantastic scenery each year, due (A) ________ increasing numbers of car owners and improvements to local roads and motorways. This, (B) ________, is placing an ever increasing pressure on this beautiful and valuable environment.

Traffic jams in and around the Lake District create air pollution. Parking facilities at most tourist sites are overflowing in peak season causing visitors to park on the grass which, (C) ________, causes soil erosion. Litter is also a problem, (D) ________ many bins are provided and people are (E) ________ to take their litter home.

Activities (F) ________ hiking, camping and mountain biking cause severe footpath erosion. Visitors often leave the designated trails, risking nesting birds and animals being disturbed, vegetation being destroyed and water courses becoming polluted.

In addition, the traditional hill farming of the Lake District has effects on the landscape. Grazing sheep (G) ________ the grass short and eat other vegetation, including young saplings. The difficulty faced now is how to preserve the beauty of this area without lowering the enjoyment of visitors or impairing the livelihoods of local farmers.
Показать полностью
Выберите из предложенных вариантов слово, которое пропущено в тексте рядом с буквой G.
  1. hold
  2. put
  3. do
  4. keep
Запишите в поле ответа цифру, соответствующую выбранному варианту ответа.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

39. Задание#T5573

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Thomas who writes:
… Last summer my family and I went to Hawaii. I’d never seen an active volcano before. We were walking on the still warm lava! I was amazed by its horror and beauty. What natural phenomenon have you ever been greatly impressed by? When did it happen? What did you feel when you experienced it?

By the way, I’ve just joined a horse-back riding club. I’ve already had three lessons. My horse’s name is Apple…
Write a letter to Thomas.
In your letter
  • answer his questions
  • ask 33 questions about Thomas’s horse.
Write 100140100–140 words.
Remember the rules of letter writing.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса

40. Задание#T5574

Comment on the following statement.
Central parts of big cities should be closed to private transport.
What is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement?
Write 200250200–250 words.
Use the following plan:
  • make an introduction (state the problem);
  • express your personal opinion and give 232–3 reasons for your opinion;
  • express an opposing opinion and give 121–2 reasons for this opposing opinion;
  • explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion;
  • make a conclusion restating your position.
Это задание составили эксперты «СтатГрада» для Яндекса
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